The Daffodil Perspective 7th July 2019

Tracklist

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Buy
0 Ulysses Kay Overture to Theater Set Chicago Sinfonietta, Paul Freeman African Heritage Symphonic Series Vol 2 Cedille Presto
5.35 Elfrida Andree Organ Symphony No.2 4th Mvt Massingsensemble, Ralph Gustafsson, Ragnar Bohlin Elfrida Andree Organ Works Swedish Society Presto
10.57 Norman Symphony No. 1 3rd Mvt National Symphony Orchestra of South Africa, Mika Eichenholz Ludvig Norman: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3 Sterling Presto
18.1 Elfrida Andree Symphony No. 2 3rd Mvt Stockholm Symphony Orchestra, Gustaf Sjökvist Elfrida Andrée: Fritiof Suite & Symphony in A minor Sterling Presto
24.16 Stenhammar String Quartet No. 3 2nd Mvt Gotland Quartet Stenhammar: String Quartets Caprice Presto
29.5 Alfven Swedish Rhapsody No. 1 Midsommervaka Orchestra Symphonique de Montreal, Charles Dutoit Rhapsodies Decca Presto
42.37 Elfrida Andree Fritiof’s Suite: Prelude Stockholm Symphony Orchestra, Gustaf Sjökvist Elfrida Andrée: Fritiof Suite & Symphony in A minor Sterling Presto
53.03 Jennifer Bernard Merkowitz The Best of Both Worlds Suzanne Newcombe, Steven Wedell N/A N/A N/A
1.05.22 Chen Yi Spring Festival Rutgers Wind Ensemble, Rutgers Symphonic Band, William Berz Distinguished Music for the Developing Band, Vol. 10 Mark Records Presto
1.08.30 Toshio Mashima Naval Bleu Showa Wind Symphony, Eugene Migliaro Corporon Dancing Winds Cafua Records Presto
1.13.07 Catharina von Rennes Vocal Quartets Op. 24 No. 5 Dufy String Quartet, Frans van Ruth, Christa Pfeiler, Irene Maessen Six Dutch Female Composers NM Presto
1.15.39 Elisabeth Kuyper 6 Lieder, Op. 17 No. 5 Dufy String Quartet, Frans van Ruth, Christa Pfeiler, Irene Maessen Six Dutch Female Composers NM Presto
1.18.52 Erika Fox Malinconia Militaire 4th Mvt (Poem) Goldfield Ensemble, Richard Uttley, Richard Baker Paths NMC Recordings Presto
1.22.49 Lamothe La Dangereuse William Chapman Nyaho Asa: Piano Music by Composers of African Descent Volume 2 MSR Classics Presto

The Daffodil Perspective 12th May 2019

 

Tracklist

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Buy
0 Sullivan Yeomen of the Guard Pro Arts Orchestra, Malcolm Sargent Gilbert and Sullivan: The Yeomen of the Guard Warner Classics Presto
7.42 Amy Beach Gaelic Symphony 1st Mvt Nashville Symphony Orchestra, Kenneth Schmerhorn Amy Beach: American Classics Naxos Presto
19.09 Chadwick Symphonic Sketches 3rd Mvt Hobgoblin Czech State Philharmonic, Jose Serebrier Chadwick: Aphrodite etc Reference Recordings Presto
25.3 Macdowell Woodland Sketches 1 and 3 Dario Mueller Edward Macdowell: Piano Works Dynamic Presto
30.24 Amy Beach Tyrolean Valse Fantasie Kirsten Johnson Amy Beach Piano Music Vol 4 Guild Presto
40.17 Foote Piano Trio in C Minor 2 nd Mvt Arden Trio Arthur Foote: Piano Trios Nos 1 and 2 Naxos Presto
46.2 Amy Beach Piano Trio in A Minor 2nd Mvt Monte Piano Trio Triptych Genuin Presto
53.15 Michiru Oshima Memories Hilary Hahn In 27 Pieces: The Hilary Hahn Encores DG Presto
57.15 Copland Fanfare for the Common Man Minnesota Orchestra, Eiji Oue Copland 100 Reference Recordings Presto
1.00.58 Joan Tower Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman No. 1 Saint Louis Symphony Orchestra, Leonard Slatkin RCA Red Seal Century Soloists and Conductors RCA Presto
1.04.26 Jeanine Rueff Diptyque Ana Oltean, Simon Bucher Ladies First! ARS Produktion Presto
1.13.27 Caroline Charriere Petite Suite 1. Contrastes Ana Oltean, Simon Bucher Ladies First! ARS Produktion Presto
1.17.55 Shanna Metallidi Flute Concertino Ana Oltean, Simon Bucher Ladies First! ARS Produktion Presto
1.29.16 Kabalevsky Galop from the Comedians BBC Philharmonic, Vassily Sinaisky Kabalevsky Piano Concertos Volume 1 Chandos Presto

The Daffodil Perspective 6th May 2019

 

The Daffodil Perspective is 6 months old. 6 months of celebrating women composers and championing gender equality. Join me for a special episode with tons of awesome music.

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Link to Buy
0 Walters Primavera Overture Royal Ballet Sinfonia, Andrew Penny Welsh Classical Favourites Marco Polo Presto
8.14 Andrea Tarrodi Lume Allmanna Sangen, Maria Goundorina Femina Moderna BIS Presto
15.52 Andrea Tarrodi Camelopardalis Vasteras Sinfonietta Tarrodi: Orchestral Works dB Productions Presto
25.21 Andrea Tarrodi String Quartet No. 2 (Madardal) Dahlkvist Quartet Tarrodi: String Quartets dB Productions Presto
32.19 Magle Rising of a New Day Radio Underholdnings Orkestar Lys På Din Vej EMI Classics Amazon
39.43 Morfydd Owen 4 Welsh Impressions Kesia Decote (piano) N/A Independent (Illuminate Women’s Music)
48.29 Hovhaness And God Created Great Whales Seattle Symphony Orchestra Alan Hovhaness: Mysterious Mountain Delos Presto
1.01.42 Keyna Wilkins Floating in Space Keyna Wilkins Orbits and Riffs Independent Bandcamp
1.07.48 Muhly Balance Problems yMusic Balance Problems Independent Bandcamp
1.16.08 Alica Needham Daughters of England Suffrage Sinfonia, Kantos Chamber Choir, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.19.35 Susan Spain Dunk Phantasy Quartet Suffrage Sinfonia, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.23.18 Ethel Smyth March of the Women Suffrage Sinfonia, Kantos Chamber Choir, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.27.39 Tristano Circle Song Francesco Tristano Piano Circle Songs Sony Presto

Classic FM Hall of Fame 2019 – Where are all the women?

The Classic FM Hall of Fame is the biggest poll of classical music tastes in the UK but is it really listeners’ choice?  Where are all the women and why?

. These are the top 20:

  1. Ralph Vaughan Williams – The Lark Ascending
  2. Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No. 2
  3. Edward Elgar – Enigma Variations
  4. Ralph Vaughan Williams – Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
  5. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
  6. Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Concerto No. 5 (‘Emperor’)
  7. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake
  8. Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 9 (‘Choral’)
  9. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – The Nutcracker
  10. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Clarinet Concerto
  11. Samuel Barber – Adagio for Strings
  12. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Requiem
  13. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – The Magic Flute
  14. Jean Sibelius – Finlandia
  15. Gregorio Allegri – Miserere
  16. Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7
  17. Ludwig van Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
  18. Edward Elgar – Cello Concerto
  19. George Frideric Handel – Messiah
  20. Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt

See the full list here.

Let’s be honest were there any real surprises here?

Why are these the most popular pieces every year?

Are these pieces really the most popular or just the pieces that Classic FM plays the most?

There’s a constant rhetoric that only the best gets voted into these types of polls.

No-ones arguing that any of these 20 pieces are anything less than stunning. Of course they are but if that is all listeners are exposed to then why expect them to pick anything else?

There were only 10 new additions to the list and none of these were in the top 100. The highest ranked was 163 so the most popular 100 pieces of music have barely changed in at least 1 year, the top 100 were definitely all in the Hall of Fame last year, probably the year before.

The only piece written by a woman was Debbie Wiseman’s The Glorious Garden, which just made it in at No. 287.

There are so many arguments about the lack of women in classical music. Women didn’t write any classical music, women didn’t write good classical music, women didn’t write music that ‘measures up to the ‘greats’.

All of this is wrong. There’s research that demonstrates that women have always been composing classical music and tons of recordings that show they have and are doing an first class job of it.

But for all this new information how many times in 2018 did Classic FM play Florence Price’s Symphony 1 or Ethel Smyth’s The Wreckers or Galina Ustvolskaya’s Piano Sonata No. 6? Or any of the other thousands (and there are thousands) of exquisite, earth shattering, beautiful pieces of music written by women?

Maybe we could decide for ourselves what measures up to the greats if we actually heard some of it.

Research conducted by Donne Women In Music last year revealed that music by women features in just 2% of concerts across the world. Full stats here.

If that’s the international average and Classic FM are similar then that’s 98% of all music played on the station written by men.

How can we judge music fairly if we are not exposed to it?

Answer – we cannot. We cannot make judgements on music we don’t hear.

Don’t Classic FM (and the BBC, LPO, Wigmore Hall etc) have a responsibility to educate their listeners?

Is it just about playing the same pieces that the audience expect to hear or can they do more?

Surely part of the reason to listen to a radio station is to be educated, be inspired, be exposed to more music than the audience would usually hear.

Radio airplay has always been one of the biggest factors in determining the pop music charts. People would turn on Radio 1, listen to a song by Kylie or Spice Girls or Oasis, love it and immediately go out and buy it. Even in today’s age of digital music, YouTube, Spotify and iTunes there is still an element of this. Radio plays a smaller but still significant role, as well as these other mediums in promoting new, unknown music to the public and creating an audience.

Why can’t it work with classical music? Why can’t we turn on to Classic FM Drive and hear music we wouldn’t hear otherwise?

If Classic FM make decisions about what audiences want to hear based on these biased polls then nothing will ever change, which it hasn’t.

Also it can’t just be about ‘what the audiences want to hear’. We don’t always know what we want to hear. I had no idea I wanted to hear Elizabeth Maconchy’s String Quartet No. 6 until I heard it and it changed my world.

We listen to radio and go to concerts because we assume the people running them know more than us. They work in music, spending all their time listening and researching interesting music, paying attention to what’s hot right now so we don’t have to. We listen to have our minds blown by fantastic music. If Classic FM and other organisations don’t programme music by women how can we be expected to vote for it on these polls?

Classic FM is a big influencer of taste.

I was chatting to a current Guildhall School of Music student a few months ago and he didn’t agree with playing more women composers because we’d be ‘neglecting the men.’

Bachtrack stats says in 2017 there were 17,741 concert performances. Of those performances around 3000 performances were of each of the top (most performed) composers – Mozart, Beethoven and Bach.  So allowing for overlap that’s somewhere between 3,000 and 9,000 performances. 3000 performances – that’s around 15% of all concerts featuring one of just 3 composers, the likely statistic is somewhere between 15% and 52%. Either end of the scale that is a huge amount of performances for just 3 composers, given how much awesome classical music there is, to focus just on those 3 is incredibly limiting.

Let’s be clear here, even if Beethoven was played half the amount that he is now it would still not come anywhere near neglect. And of course it wouldn’t make his work any less awesome or popular, His Piano Concerto No. 5 will always be brilliant and I’ll always love it, as will many other people.

Why can’t a balance exist between playing the old, familiar classics and awesome, unfamiliar music. A mix of what we want to hear and music that we don’t know but Classic FM think we will like.

There is a ton of phenomenal music out there from the whole history of classical music and the internet has made it easier than ever before to find it. There are vast numbers of recordings of music by women that are easy to find on iTunes, PrestoClasssical, Amazon and Spotify. So many resources available for Classic FM to use.

So what now? Will Classic FM continue to justify playing nothing but the same music year after year by using biased data like these polls?

Or can Classic FM exert their power as a major influencer of taste, creating more balanced programming and exposing the massive amount of awesome classical music written by women?

Will the Hall of Fame 2020 tell a different story?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Daffodil Perspective 16th April 2019

 

Tracklist

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Link to Buy
0 Bernstein Magnificent Seven Theme All Souls Orchestra Prom Praise – How Great Thou Art Integrity Music Amazon
6.28 Emilie Mayer String Quartet 2nd Movt Klenke Quartet Emilie Mayer: Symphony No 4 Chandos Presto
10.13 Loewe Alpenfantasie Linda Nicholson (piano) Carl Loewe: Piano Music Volume 1 Toccata Classics Presto
19.36 Emilie Mayer Piano Concerto 3rd Movt Neubrandenburg Philharmonie, Sebastian Tewinkel, Ewa Kupiec (piano) Emilie Mayer: Symphony No 4 Chandos Presto
29.07 Wagner Lohengrin Prelude to Act 3 Philadelphia Orchestra, Christian Thielemann Wagner: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, etc. DG Presto
32.38 Liszt Piano Concerto No 1 1st Mvt Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Kurt Masur, Michel Béroff (piano) 100 Best Liszt Warner Classics Presto
38.23 Emilie Mayer Symphony 5(&) in F Minor Kammersymphonie Berlin, Jurgen Bruns Mayer: Symphony No. 5 / Hensel: Hero und Leander / Le Beau: Piano Concerto Op. 37 Dreyer Gaido Amazon
50.21 Sarah Wallin Huff Courage Triptych 1: A Garden Prayer Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra,
Petr Vronský
Vit Mužik (violin), Lucie Kaucka (piano), Jakub Lâtal (violin), Jaroslav Kužela (soprano saxophone)
Soul of the Machine: Sarah Wallin Huff PARMA Recordings Presto
55.34 Rosanna Scalfi Marcello Cantata 3: Aria – Clori No Sempre Nel Core Darryl Taylor (counter-tenor), Ann Marie Morgan (baroque cello), Deborah Fox (theorbo), Jory Vinikour (harpsichord) Scalfi Marcello: Complete Solo Cantatas Naxos Presto
1.00.02 Scarlatti Con Qual Cor Mi Chiedi Pace Max Emanuel Cenčić (counter-tenor), Yasunori Imamura (theorbo), Aline Zylberajch (fortepiano), Maya Amrein (cello) D Scarlatti: Cantatas Capriccio Presto
1.05.03 Jeanne Leleu Suite Symphonique Pour Instruments A Vent Et Piano Orchestre d’Harmonie du Conservatoire de Maastricht Anthologie des musiques originales pour orchestre à vent au XXème siècle – Femmes Compositeurs, Vol. 5 (Anthology of wind band music 20th Century Women Composers Vol. 5) Cristal Records Amazon
1.08.04 Florence Collin Les Catacombes De Pompei Orchestre d’Harmonie du Conservatoire de Maastricht Anthologie des musiques originales pour orchestre à vent au XXème siècle – Femmes Compositeurs, Vol. 5 (Anthology of wind band music 20th Century Women Composers Vol. 5) Cristal Records Amazon
1.15.53 Ida Gotkovsky Concerto Pour Grand Orchestra Et Saxophone 3rd Mvt Orchestre d’Harmonie du Conservatoire de Maastricht Anthologie des musiques originales pour orchestre à vent au XXème siècle – Femmes Compositeurs, Vol. 5 (Anthology of wind band music 20th Century Women Composers Vol. 5) Cristal Records Amazon
1.27.07 Mayerl Marigold Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra, Gary Carpenter Billy Mayerl: Aquarium Suite and other works Marco Polo Presto

 

A-Z of classical composers – gender equal edition

A few days ago John Suchet at the BBC tweeted about composers whose names begin with B. The names he mentioned were super obvious male composers – Beethoven, Brahms, Bach and Bizet. Naturally members of the community working for gender equality, myself included, had a rant at him and replied with the names of awesome female composers whose names also begin with B. Names we mentioned included Beach, Bacewicz, Boulanger, Bonis, Bosmans and lots more.

I decided to take this a few steps further and create a gender equal alphabet of classical composers.

This is the result, an A-Z of awesome classical composers. Every one of them has written lots of awesome music.

A is for Lera Auerbach and Albinoni

B is for Bach and Amy Beach

C is for Cecile Chaminade and Chopin

D is for Debussy and Alma Deutscher

E is for Rosalind Ellicott and Elgar

F is for Faure and Louise Farrenc

G is for Ruth Gipps and Glass

H is for Handel and Augusta Holmes

I is for Adina Izarra and Ives

J is for Jenkins and Betsy Jolas

K is for Larysa Kuzmenko and Khachaturian

L is for Liszt and Elisabeth Lutyens

M is for Marianna Martines and Mozart

N is for Nielson and Olga Neuwirth

O is for Morfydd Owen and Offenbach

P is for Puccini and Florence Price

Q is for Marie Quinalt and Quilter

R is for Rachmaninov and Priaulx Rainier

S is for Ethel Smyth and Saint Saens

T is for Tchaikovsky and Joan Tower

U is for Galina Ustvolskaya and Uematsu

V is for Vaughan Williams and Pauline Viardot

W is for Judith Weir and Wagner

X is for Xenakis and Qu Xixian

Y is for Chen Yi and Ysaye

Z is for Hans Zimmer and Gaziza Zhubanova

Playlist to follow shortly.

 

 

 

Gender equality is for life, not just International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day is upon us again and like every year there are tons of events, concerts and festivals going on all over the world to celebrate it.

The IWD website says this for 2019:

The International Women’s Day 2019 campaign theme of #BalanceforBetter is a call-to-action for driving gender balance across the world.

But what does IWD really mean?

Does it drive towards a more gender balanced world?

Or has the work been corrupted to create more inequality and more imbalance?

The IWD website states:

International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

IWD is full of events promoting equality. One example is Women of the World festival at the Southbank. WOW brings together thousands of people for talks, workshops, concerts and many other events about women. WOW also showcases dozens of amazing organisations working to promote equality all year round. Last year they had demonstrations from a women’s wrestling group, networking events for women and a camp for girls to study rock music.

So, IWD is not just about celebrating the achievements of women, it’s encouraging people to work on equality all year round.

Now let’s examine IWD in the classical music industry. In 2018:

BBC Radio 3 scheduled an entire day of music by women composers.

ABC Classic FM in Australia played an entire 24 hours of women composers.

Cadogan Hall scheduled a concert entirely of female composers.

In 2019:

BBC Radio 3 and ABC are again playing an entire day of music by women composers.

BBC National Orchestra of Wales is playing a concert of female composers.

International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

So says the IWD website. It’s no doubt that BBC, ABC, Cadogan Hall and others do a great job doing the first part, celebrating the cultural achievements of women.

But what about the second part? Accelerating gender parity?

Let’s have a look at the rest of the year.

On ABC Classic FM music by women composers makes up 6% of all music played. (up from 2% in 2015.)

The official BBC stats are not published but the world average for radio programming and concert programming is 2%. That’s 2% of concerts a year featuring a woman composer. The BBC Proms stats for 2018 compiled by Women in Music show women composers made up 15% (21/133) of the number of composers. This is not number of works composed by women or total amount of performance time, which would both be undoubtedly much smaller percentages.

For example Sarah Walker’s Sunday Morning show on BBC Radio 3 plays 1 woman composer a week, out of at least 10 composers in a 3 hour show. Being optimistic means that’s 10% of music every week composed by a woman. (The number is probably lower and doesn’t account for actual airtime.)

Cadogan Hall are putting on about 100 concerts this year, at my count 3 of these concerts feature a woman composer.

Clearly these organisations fall short on the second part and do almost nothing the rest of the year to accelerate gender parity.

IWD should be a jumping off point to encourage more work on gender parity throughout the year. It shouldn’t be an excuse to shove all the women composers in one day and then continue marginalising them the rest of the year. That’s not gender equality.

Forbes magazine said last year:

BBC Radio 3 will spend International Women’s Day righting wrongs.

Radio 3 is slated to celebrate female composers excluded from the narrative of musical history.

Bearing in mind that the BBC are one of the organisations doing the excluding.

For example, BBC Proms has performed Dame Elizabeth Maconchy’s music 13 times while her contemporary Benjamin Britten’s music has been performed 94 times at the Proms.

Righting wrongs would be performing Dame Elizabeth Maconchy at least as much as Benjamin Britten all year round. Not playing her music once a year. Dame Maconchy and all the other hundreds of female composers have been and are being marginalised every day for decades, centuries in some cases. One day of programming is not righting this wrong. It is a step, and a very small one in the right direction but these organisations need to programme more women composers consistently throughout the year.

Also at what point on IWD do the BBC programme Louise Farrenc’s Symphony No 3 or Amanda Maier’s Violin Sonata and not think ‘Wow, this is amazing, we should play this more often’?

It’s the same with Black History Month. In classical music composers such as W.G. Still, Florence Price and Adolphus Hailstork should be played all year round. These composers are marginalised due to to deep institutional prejudice that can only be changed through constant and consistent programming, not a token performance once a year.

(Plus just pointing out black people invented blues, jazz, rock and roll, soul, disco, gospel, RnB and hip hop. Yet somehow the inventor of rock and roll, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, is only ever mentioned during BHM. Funny that.)

IWD started with a noble and worthy purpose of highlighting the achievements of women and encouraging increased dialogue on equality all year round. IWD itself promotes equality every day of the year and does amazing work.

However, too many other organisations seem to use IWD as an opportunity to put these groups in their boxes, only programme them on this one day and call it progress whilst contributing further to the inequality in the classical music industry.

Then the next year rolls around again and we’re celebrating the same ‘underrated and excluded’ composers again, brushing over the fact that they’re still excluded because the powers that be didn’t play them in the whole year in between. They wouldn’t be marginalised if they were performed more often all year round. And so the vicious cycle continues.

This IWD let’s remember this and work on creating gender parity every day of the year

The Daffodil Perspective radio show is pleased to play equal numbers of women and men composers, with equal airtime, every single week.

What can you do?

 

 

 

 

 

What is ‘greatness’ in classical music?

Everyone’s got this image of all the ‘great’ composers. They’re all dead white men. British journalist Fiona Maddocks said in 2011:

“For all the many good, even excellent women composers, why has there not yet been a great one? Where is the possessed, wild eyed, crackpot female answer to Beethoven, who battled on through deafness, loneliness, financial worry and disease to create timeless masterpieces?”

What do we mean by greatness? And how do you define greatness?

Let’s have a look at one example: Dame Elizabeth Maconchy was denied the Mendelssohn scholarship by RCM director Sir Hugh Allen because she’d “only get married and never write another note.”

Maconchy tried to get her music published by musical powerhouse company Boosey & Hawkes but Boosey rejected it because:

‘they would not consider publishing orchestral music by a young lady, perhaps a few songs’

So, women are only allowed to write nice little songs and leave the symphonies to men? Maconchy went on to write several huge orchestral works including her symphony for double string orchestra.

 

Maconchy also wrote 13 of the most extraordinary string quartets in history. In total she wrote over 200 works over a 60 year career, became a CBE then a Dame. She also battled and triumphed against TB, a disease which had already claimed half her family.

These comments by Boosey are not unique, similar comments were made, and are still being made, to many female composers throughout history. Given so much rampant sexism and prejudice it’s a wonder any music by women exists at all.

Does greatness mean the courage to carry on and write music that you believe in despite what other people think? If so, surely Elizabeth Maconchy has to be one of the great composers?

Louise Farrenc (1804-1875) was the first woman ever to be appointed as Professor of Piano at the Paris Conservatoire. She shared equal responsibility for the women’s piano divison with Henri Hertz. They did exactly the same job but because he was a man he got paid more, that is until Farrenc demanded equal pay.

Along with teaching Farrenc wrote 3 incredible symphonies and a bucketload of other incredible music including lots of piano music and chamber music.

Does greatness mean the courage to stand up and fight for your right to be treated the same as others for the same work? If so, surely Farrenc must also be a ‘great’ composer right?

Florence Price (1887-1953), in her own words, had ‘two handicaps, those of sex and race.’

Price was born in 1887 and grew up in suburban Arkansas during the harsh era of Jim Crow racist legislation, she saw incredible violence and racism, eventually moving to Chicago to escape. Despite being a prodigious talent and going to university at 14 it would be another 30 years before she was able to write her Symphony in E Minor and that was because she ‘had the good fortune to break her foot”. This was after becoming a single mother and sharing a tiny flat with her student Margaret Bonds. Her Symphony in E Minor was premiered in 1933 by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Florence Price became the 1st African American woman to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra. She went on to write 3 more symphonies, a piano concerto, a violin concerto, a piano sonata and lots more music during a 20 year career that took off in middle age.

Does greatness mean knowing all the unfair obstacles that you face, holding your ground and not giving up, even after decades? If so, then surely Florence Price must be a great composer?

Why do we only associate greatness with this overly Romantic notion of deaf, half insane composers struggling away in leaky attics?

Let’s look now at Dame Ethel Smyth. Her uptight military Dad wouldn’t let her her study music so she locked herself in her room and refused to eat or come out until he allowed her to study music at Leipzig Conservatory. 14 years old Smyth was already a legend.

Smyth did go on to study music and she became a phenomenal composer but then she was constantly the victim of impossible double standards.

“On the one hand, when she composed powerful, rhythmically vital music, it was said that her work lacked feminine charm; on the other, when she produced delicate, melodious compositions, she was accused of not measuring up to the artistic standards of her male colleagues.”

This is a constant rhetoric for women who compose music. Only write delicate, pretty little music even though you’ll be judged for not writing huge power music that men write.

Ethel Smyth carried on regardless, she wrote several operas and numerous orchestral music plus a brilliant Mass in D.

Dame Ethel Smyth was the first woman composer to be knighted as a Dame and up until 2016 she was the first and only woman composer to have an opera performed by the Met Opera in New York.

In addition to being a phenomenal composer Smyth was a strong advocate for women’s right. She joined the Women’s Suffrage movement and worked with them for two years. Smyth also had numerous affairs with women, was apparently obsessed with the married Emmeline Pankhurst and fell into unrequited love with Virginia Woolf. Smyth was a badass alright.

Marianna Martines (1744-1812) wasn’t allowed to be paid as a professional composer because of her gender but she became the first woman to be admitted to the Accademia Philharmica, the same prestigious institution Mozart to which the ‘great’ composer Mozart was also admitted.

The Czech composer Vitezslava Kapralova (1915-1940) was exiled in Paris for the last 2 years of her life because of the war.

Nadia Boulanger (1887-1979) was a brilliant composer and pedagogue who taught practically every major composer of the 20th century. She also became the 1st woman to conduct the London Philharmonic Orchestra.

All these women, and hundreds more, wrote lots of brilliant music. They were respected, even adored by their male peers, they won recognition in the form of commissions and prizes, Smyth and Maconchy were knighted. Despite all the veneration these women received during their life every one of these composers was obliterated from the canon after their death.

A frequent sexist argument against women composers being more well known is that their music just isn’t good enough. Nothing is further from the truth. In so many cases it’s not merely good enough, it’s better by far.

But I don’t want to make this a battle of the sexes over who composes better, more meaningful music. It’s not a fight to show women write music as well as men. They just do.

The only reason Louise Farrenc, Ethel Smyth, Florence Price, Elizabeth Maconchy, Marianna Martines, Barbara Strozzi, Amy Beach, Vitezslava Kapralova and all the hundreds of other women composers are not as equally regarded as Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Britten and Tchaikovsky etc is because of their gender.

The fact that Dame Elizabeth Maconchy is a woman is the only reason her music is performed about 1/100th the amount of her contemporary Britten.

Centuries of deep institutional level prejudice and sexism is what is keeping the music of these women from concert programmes. Women have been systematically, consistently and constantly marginalised.

Again I ask, what is greatness?

Is it accolades? Maconchy and Smyth are Dames, Elisabeth Lutyens a CBE.

Number of symphonies written? Louise Farrenc wrote 3, Emilie Mayer wrote 7, Gloria Coates wrote 16.

Is greatness obstacles hurdled? Firsts achieved?

Is greatness staring bankruptcy in the face while battling syphillis in an attic in Vienna?

Or is greatness the ability to create and keep creating stunning music in spite of many people telling you that you can’t?

All women who compose music are great.

Florence Price once asked Sergei Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra to judge her music not on the basis of her race or sex, but on musical merit alone. He never went on to programme any of her music, read into that what you will.

Let’s do what he seemingly couldn’t and judge women on the basis of musical merit alone.

Let us redefine what greatness means, rewrite history and create a more gender balanced future for the benefit of everyone.

 

 

 

News for my 100 day anniversary!!!

Today is 100 days since the 1st broadcast of The Daffodil Perspective, and to celebrate I’m taking it to the next level, so much exciting news to share.

1, I’ve launched my brand new logo everywhere. I think it looks really cool!

2. Also got a brand new and improved home page. Read all about my mission here.

3. I’m pleased to announce Contemporary Corner has its first monthly residency with PARMA Recordings! On the 3rd Tuesday of every month I will be showcasing a single composer album by one of their awesome composers. This is starting on the 19th March.

4. Im also excited to announce I’m now a contributor on Women in Music Blog, a fantastic organisation started 30 years ago by composers Odaline de la Martinez, Nicola leFanu and others to support and promote women working in the arts. Fingers crossed to be a full member soon too. Next week on the show I’m very excited to feature the music of Lucy Hollingworth, a brilliant composer and by happy coincidence a trustee of Women in Music.

5. I wrote a guest blog on Dame Elizabeth Maconchy for Illuminate Women’s Music, another trailblazing organisation supporting and promoting women composers. We have a great relationship and I’ve been pleased to feature some of their live recordings every month on the show. Check out my piece on Maconchy and find out more about Illuminate here.  They will be playing music by Maconchy at the Royal College of Music on Saturday 16th February, a concert not to be missed.

6. This week Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy mentioned my blog post on their Monday Link Round up. Check it out and find out about their amazing work here. Shout out to them and all the work they do seeing music by women gets performed.

7. I’ve been playing Florence Price a lot on my show so I’ve decided to make my celebration of her official, introducing Fun With Florence! Every month I’ll be showcasing a different piece by this amazing woman along with sharing her story, what inspires me so much about her and a few lessons she can teach us.

That will be happening on the 4th Tuesday of every month and I’m starting with a very special recording from pianist Samantha Ege, a fellow champion of Price and brilliant interpreter of Price’s music.  Her album Four Women was released in November, I was very excited to feature it as my album of the week on the 27th November. Have a listen to Ege’s rendition of Price’s Sonata in E Minor from the album Four Women.

To find out more about Samantha Ege and her work check out her awesome site Music Herstories here

8. I created my first curated Spotify playlist – a basic guide to female composers throughout history starting with Hildegard von Bingen, moving through the eras to the 21st century. Just some of the many awesome women composers. Check it out.

Expect more curated playlists coming soon…

9. Lastly shout to composer Rebecca Rowe, I featured her wonderful Fantasie In Nomine in Contemporary Corner on 29th January. Pleased to get a mention on her site too, she’s got tons of great things happening, check it all out here.

10. That’s almost it, I’m planning on starting more regular blog features including updates on new releases, upcoming events and various curated playlists. Few more things in the works, will drop them as soon as I can.  Check out my Facebook page and Twitter for updates.

Here’s to a more gender balanced future!

 

 

The Daffodil Perspective 12th February 2019

This show we’re going back to the Baroque with Francesca Caccini, in 1625 she became the first woman to write a full scale opera. We discover more about her life and career along with her friends at the Medici court Jacopo Peri and Marco da Gagliano. Plus two composers who collaborated with Langston Hughes, leader of the Harlem Renaissance – Florence Price and Kurt Weill.

Contemporary Corner – Joanna Ward

This week I’m showcasing a brand new piece by trailblazing young composer Joanna Ward. Cambridge student and committee member for the 1st ever Cambridge Female Composers Festival 2019.

Album Of The Week – Tasmin Little Plays: Clara Schumann, Dame Ethel Smyth and Amy Beach

Very excited to feature stunning new album by world class violinist Tasmin Little performing works by 3 incredible marginalised composers – Clara Schumann, Dame Ethel Smyth and Amy Beach.

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