The Daffodil Perspective 30th June 2019

 

Tracklist

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Buy
0 Mendelssohn Fingal’s Cave (Hebrides Overture) Wiener Philharmoniker, Christoph von Dohnanyi Mendelssohn: Symphonies Nos. 3 and 4 Decca Presto
11.01 Elisabetta Gambarini Sonata No. 1: 1st Mvt Anthony Noble Complete Works for Harpsichord Herald Presto
14.21 Handel See The Conqu’ring Hero Comes from Judas Maccabeus Handel Opera Society Orchestra, Handel Opera Society Chorus, Charles Farncombe World of Handel Decca Presto
18.37 Elisabetta Gambarini Lessons for Harpsichord Op 2: III Anthony Noble Complete Works for Harpsichord Herald Presto
22.15 Arne Rule, Brittania! London Philharmonic Orchestra, Royal Choral Society, Sir Anrdew Davis Last Night of the Proms Warner Classics Presto
27.13 Boyce Symphony 1: 1st Mvt The Academy of Ancient Music, Christopher Hogwood Boyce: Symphonies 1-8 Decca Presto
30.15 Elisabetta Gambarini Variations on the Foregoing Song: Gige Anthony Noble Complete Works for Harpsichord Herald Presto
33.46 Eleanor Alberga String Quartet 1: 3rd Mvt Ensemble Arcadiana Eleanor Alberga: String Quartets Nos. 1-3 Navona Records Presto
42.27 Florence Price Don’t You Tell Me No Christine Jobson (soprano) Gregory Thompson (piano) Nearly Lost: Art Songs of Florence Price Independent CDBaby
46.51 Teresa Procaccini Tre Pezzi per fagotto e pianoforte, Op. 30: I. Presto – II. Andante – III. Allegro Domenico Losavio & Teresa Procaccini Musica da Camera 1 Edi-Pan-Srl CDBaby
55.01 Tansman Sonatine for Bassoon and Piano Per Hannisdal (bassoon), Vebjørn Anvik (piano) The Lyrical Bassoon 2L CDBaby
1.03.13 Violet Archer Piano Concerto 1: II Christina Petrowska Quilico Archer, Louie and Kuzmenko: 3 Concerti Centrediscs Presto
1.11.07 Larysa Kuzmenko Piano Concerto 1: III Christina Petrowska Quilico Archer, Louie and Kuzmenko: 3 Concerti Centrediscs Presto
1.17.20 Jospehine Lang An den See Heike Hallaschka (soprano), Heidi Kommerell (piano) Josephine Lang – Lieder Audite Presto
1.23.05 Thomas Jefferson Anderson Squares: An Essay for Orchestra Baltimor Symphony Orchestra, Paul Freeman Black Composer Series, Vol. 8: Olly Woodrow Wilson, Thomas Jefferson Anderson, Jr. & Talib Rasul Hakim Sony Presto

The Daffodil Perspective 19th May 2019

 

Tracklist

Time Composer Work Performer Album Label Buy
0 Williams Theme from Sabrina John Williams Sabrina: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack A&M Records Amazon
5.22 Rachel Portman Theme from Emma Royal Scottish National Orchestra Hollywood 96 Varese Sarabande Amazon
8.46 Rachel Portman Chocolat Main Titles Rachel Portman Chocolat (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) Sony Classical Amazon
12.29 Rachel Portman Belle Main Titles, This is Portrait Revealed City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra Belle (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) Varese Sarabande Amazon
16.49 Verdina Shlonsky Pages From The Diary Fidan Aghayeva Edler Verbotene Klänge: Sechs Suiten Kreuzberg Records Amazon
29.57 Hailstork Symphony 3 1st Mvt Grand Rapids Symphony, David Lockington Hailstork Symphonies 2 & 3 Naxos Presto
43.05 Edie Hill From The Wingbone of a Swan II Source The Crossing, Donald Nally Clay Jug PARMA Recordings Presto
49.41 Mendelssohn Piano Trio in D Minor 1st Mvt Gian Luca Petrucci (flute), János Devich (cello), Jenő Jandó (piano) Farrenc & Mendelssohn: Flute Trios Tudor Presto
1.00.08 Louise Farrenc Piano Trio in E Minor 1st Mvt Gian Luca Petrucci (flute), János Devich (cello), Jenő Jandó (piano) Farrenc & Mendelssohn: Flute Trios Tudor Presto
1.10.58 Alakotila Concerto Grosse Oeverture Paul Taylor OrCHestra Alphorn & Nordic Winds Solo Musica Presto
1.19.58 Sanna Kurki Suoni Tass On Neinen Paul Taylor OrCHestra Alphorn & Nordic Winds Solo Musica Presto
1.27.16 Jarre Dr Zhivago Lara’s Theme Cinema Stage Orchestra Doctor Zhivago RKO Music Amazon

The Daffodil Perspective 6th May 2019

 

The Daffodil Perspective is 6 months old. 6 months of celebrating women composers and championing gender equality. Join me for a special episode with tons of awesome music.

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Label Link to Buy
0 Walters Primavera Overture Royal Ballet Sinfonia, Andrew Penny Welsh Classical Favourites Marco Polo Presto
8.14 Andrea Tarrodi Lume Allmanna Sangen, Maria Goundorina Femina Moderna BIS Presto
15.52 Andrea Tarrodi Camelopardalis Vasteras Sinfonietta Tarrodi: Orchestral Works dB Productions Presto
25.21 Andrea Tarrodi String Quartet No. 2 (Madardal) Dahlkvist Quartet Tarrodi: String Quartets dB Productions Presto
32.19 Magle Rising of a New Day Radio Underholdnings Orkestar Lys På Din Vej EMI Classics Amazon
39.43 Morfydd Owen 4 Welsh Impressions Kesia Decote (piano) N/A Independent (Illuminate Women’s Music)
48.29 Hovhaness And God Created Great Whales Seattle Symphony Orchestra Alan Hovhaness: Mysterious Mountain Delos Presto
1.01.42 Keyna Wilkins Floating in Space Keyna Wilkins Orbits and Riffs Independent Bandcamp
1.07.48 Muhly Balance Problems yMusic Balance Problems Independent Bandcamp
1.16.08 Alica Needham Daughters of England Suffrage Sinfonia, Kantos Chamber Choir, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.19.35 Susan Spain Dunk Phantasy Quartet Suffrage Sinfonia, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.23.18 Ethel Smyth March of the Women Suffrage Sinfonia, Kantos Chamber Choir, Alice Farnham Lost Women of Music ABC Classics Presto
1.27.39 Tristano Circle Song Francesco Tristano Piano Circle Songs Sony Presto

The Daffodil Perspective 28th April 2019

Tracklist

Airtime Composer Work Performer Album Link to Buy
0.00 Sinding The Rustle of Spring Eva Knardahl (piano) Great Norwegian Performers 1945-2000 (Simax 2008) Presto
3.49 Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre Harpsichord Suite no 1 in D minor Allemande Elisabetta Guglielmin (harpsichord) Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre Pieces De Clavecin (Aavea 2017) Presto
7.29 Couperin Pieces De Clavecin 1 in G Major Menuet Et Double Lawrence Cummings (harpsichord) Couperin: Music for Harpsichord Vol 1 (Naxos 1997) Presto
11.08 Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre Cephale et Procris Overture Peter Sykes (harpsichord) Na’ama Lion (baroque flute) Protegee Of The Sun King Music by Jacquet de la Guerre (Centaur 2005) Presto
15.58 Marchand Harpsichord Suite in D Minor Davitt Moroney (harpsichord) Le Clavecin Français: Louis Marchand & Louis-Nicolas Clérambault (Plectra Music 2007) CDBaby
19.20 Marais 2nd Suite for Viol Allemande Anne Gallet, Hopkinson Smith, Jordi Savall Marin Marais: Pieces for Viol from the Five Books (Heritage 2010) Presto
23.04 Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre Violin Sonata No. 6 Adagio Les Dominos Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre: Sonatas for violin and basso continuo (Ricercar 2011) Presto
28.19 Dorothy Howell Lamia Karelia Philharmonic Orchestra British Orchestral Premieres (Lyrita 2018) Presto
43.56 Bax Tintagel Royal Scottish National Orchestra Bax: Symphony No. 7 et al(Naxos 2003) Presto
59.23 Andrea Reinkemeyer In The Speaking Silence Post Haste Reed Duo Donut Robot (Aerocade Music 2019) Bandcamp
1.09.13 Josephine Lang An Der See Heike Hallaschka (soprano) Heidi Kommerrell (piano) Josephine Lang: Lieder (Audite 2003) Amazon
1.15.13 Grazyna Bacewicz Piano Sonata No. 2 3rd Mvt Morta Grigliunaite (piano) Bacewicz: Piano Music (Piano Classics 2019) Presto
1.19.47 Victoria Bond Instruments of Revelation High Priestess Chicago Pro Musica Victoria Bond: Instruments of Revelation (Naxos American Classics 2019) Presto
1.25.37 Piazzolla Libertango Moscow Chamber Orchestra Showpieces & Encores (Delos 2002) Presto

Classic FM Hall of Fame 2019 – Where are all the women?

The Classic FM Hall of Fame is the biggest poll of classical music tastes in the UK but is it really listeners’ choice?  Where are all the women and why?

. These are the top 20:

  1. Ralph Vaughan Williams – The Lark Ascending
  2. Sergei Rachmaninoff – Piano Concerto No. 2
  3. Edward Elgar – Enigma Variations
  4. Ralph Vaughan Williams – Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis
  5. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture
  6. Ludwig van Beethoven – Piano Concerto No. 5 (‘Emperor’)
  7. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Swan Lake
  8. Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 9 (‘Choral’)
  9. Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – The Nutcracker
  10. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Clarinet Concerto
  11. Samuel Barber – Adagio for Strings
  12. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Requiem
  13. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – The Magic Flute
  14. Jean Sibelius – Finlandia
  15. Gregorio Allegri – Miserere
  16. Ludwig van Beethoven – Symphony No. 7
  17. Ludwig van Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata
  18. Edward Elgar – Cello Concerto
  19. George Frideric Handel – Messiah
  20. Edvard Grieg – Peer Gynt

See the full list here.

Let’s be honest were there any real surprises here?

Why are these the most popular pieces every year?

Are these pieces really the most popular or just the pieces that Classic FM plays the most?

There’s a constant rhetoric that only the best gets voted into these types of polls.

No-ones arguing that any of these 20 pieces are anything less than stunning. Of course they are but if that is all listeners are exposed to then why expect them to pick anything else?

There were only 10 new additions to the list and none of these were in the top 100. The highest ranked was 163 so the most popular 100 pieces of music have barely changed in at least 1 year, the top 100 were definitely all in the Hall of Fame last year, probably the year before.

The only piece written by a woman was Debbie Wiseman’s The Glorious Garden, which just made it in at No. 287.

There are so many arguments about the lack of women in classical music. Women didn’t write any classical music, women didn’t write good classical music, women didn’t write music that ‘measures up to the ‘greats’.

All of this is wrong. There’s research that demonstrates that women have always been composing classical music and tons of recordings that show they have and are doing an first class job of it.

But for all this new information how many times in 2018 did Classic FM play Florence Price’s Symphony 1 or Ethel Smyth’s The Wreckers or Galina Ustvolskaya’s Piano Sonata No. 6? Or any of the other thousands (and there are thousands) of exquisite, earth shattering, beautiful pieces of music written by women?

Maybe we could decide for ourselves what measures up to the greats if we actually heard some of it.

Research conducted by Donne Women In Music last year revealed that music by women features in just 2% of concerts across the world. Full stats here.

If that’s the international average and Classic FM are similar then that’s 98% of all music played on the station written by men.

How can we judge music fairly if we are not exposed to it?

Answer – we cannot. We cannot make judgements on music we don’t hear.

Don’t Classic FM (and the BBC, LPO, Wigmore Hall etc) have a responsibility to educate their listeners?

Is it just about playing the same pieces that the audience expect to hear or can they do more?

Surely part of the reason to listen to a radio station is to be educated, be inspired, be exposed to more music than the audience would usually hear.

Radio airplay has always been one of the biggest factors in determining the pop music charts. People would turn on Radio 1, listen to a song by Kylie or Spice Girls or Oasis, love it and immediately go out and buy it. Even in today’s age of digital music, YouTube, Spotify and iTunes there is still an element of this. Radio plays a smaller but still significant role, as well as these other mediums in promoting new, unknown music to the public and creating an audience.

Why can’t it work with classical music? Why can’t we turn on to Classic FM Drive and hear music we wouldn’t hear otherwise?

If Classic FM make decisions about what audiences want to hear based on these biased polls then nothing will ever change, which it hasn’t.

Also it can’t just be about ‘what the audiences want to hear’. We don’t always know what we want to hear. I had no idea I wanted to hear Elizabeth Maconchy’s String Quartet No. 6 until I heard it and it changed my world.

We listen to radio and go to concerts because we assume the people running them know more than us. They work in music, spending all their time listening and researching interesting music, paying attention to what’s hot right now so we don’t have to. We listen to have our minds blown by fantastic music. If Classic FM and other organisations don’t programme music by women how can we be expected to vote for it on these polls?

Classic FM is a big influencer of taste.

I was chatting to a current Guildhall School of Music student a few months ago and he didn’t agree with playing more women composers because we’d be ‘neglecting the men.’

Bachtrack stats says in 2017 there were 17,741 concert performances. Of those performances around 3000 performances were of each of the top (most performed) composers – Mozart, Beethoven and Bach.  So allowing for overlap that’s somewhere between 3,000 and 9,000 performances. 3000 performances – that’s around 15% of all concerts featuring one of just 3 composers, the likely statistic is somewhere between 15% and 52%. Either end of the scale that is a huge amount of performances for just 3 composers, given how much awesome classical music there is, to focus just on those 3 is incredibly limiting.

Let’s be clear here, even if Beethoven was played half the amount that he is now it would still not come anywhere near neglect. And of course it wouldn’t make his work any less awesome or popular, His Piano Concerto No. 5 will always be brilliant and I’ll always love it, as will many other people.

Why can’t a balance exist between playing the old, familiar classics and awesome, unfamiliar music. A mix of what we want to hear and music that we don’t know but Classic FM think we will like.

There is a ton of phenomenal music out there from the whole history of classical music and the internet has made it easier than ever before to find it. There are vast numbers of recordings of music by women that are easy to find on iTunes, PrestoClasssical, Amazon and Spotify. So many resources available for Classic FM to use.

So what now? Will Classic FM continue to justify playing nothing but the same music year after year by using biased data like these polls?

Or can Classic FM exert their power as a major influencer of taste, creating more balanced programming and exposing the massive amount of awesome classical music written by women?

Will the Hall of Fame 2020 tell a different story?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News for my 100 day anniversary!!!

Today is 100 days since the 1st broadcast of The Daffodil Perspective, and to celebrate I’m taking it to the next level, so much exciting news to share.

1, I’ve launched my brand new logo everywhere. I think it looks really cool!

2. Also got a brand new and improved home page. Read all about my mission here.

3. I’m pleased to announce Contemporary Corner has its first monthly residency with PARMA Recordings! On the 3rd Tuesday of every month I will be showcasing a single composer album by one of their awesome composers. This is starting on the 19th March.

4. Im also excited to announce I’m now a contributor on Women in Music Blog, a fantastic organisation started 30 years ago by composers Odaline de la Martinez, Nicola leFanu and others to support and promote women working in the arts. Fingers crossed to be a full member soon too. Next week on the show I’m very excited to feature the music of Lucy Hollingworth, a brilliant composer and by happy coincidence a trustee of Women in Music.

5. I wrote a guest blog on Dame Elizabeth Maconchy for Illuminate Women’s Music, another trailblazing organisation supporting and promoting women composers. We have a great relationship and I’ve been pleased to feature some of their live recordings every month on the show. Check out my piece on Maconchy and find out more about Illuminate here.  They will be playing music by Maconchy at the Royal College of Music on Saturday 16th February, a concert not to be missed.

6. This week Women’s Philharmonic Advocacy mentioned my blog post on their Monday Link Round up. Check it out and find out about their amazing work here. Shout out to them and all the work they do seeing music by women gets performed.

7. I’ve been playing Florence Price a lot on my show so I’ve decided to make my celebration of her official, introducing Fun With Florence! Every month I’ll be showcasing a different piece by this amazing woman along with sharing her story, what inspires me so much about her and a few lessons she can teach us.

That will be happening on the 4th Tuesday of every month and I’m starting with a very special recording from pianist Samantha Ege, a fellow champion of Price and brilliant interpreter of Price’s music.  Her album Four Women was released in November, I was very excited to feature it as my album of the week on the 27th November. Have a listen to Ege’s rendition of Price’s Sonata in E Minor from the album Four Women.

To find out more about Samantha Ege and her work check out her awesome site Music Herstories here

8. I created my first curated Spotify playlist – a basic guide to female composers throughout history starting with Hildegard von Bingen, moving through the eras to the 21st century. Just some of the many awesome women composers. Check it out.

Expect more curated playlists coming soon…

9. Lastly shout to composer Rebecca Rowe, I featured her wonderful Fantasie In Nomine in Contemporary Corner on 29th January. Pleased to get a mention on her site too, she’s got tons of great things happening, check it all out here.

10. That’s almost it, I’m planning on starting more regular blog features including updates on new releases, upcoming events and various curated playlists. Few more things in the works, will drop them as soon as I can.  Check out my Facebook page and Twitter for updates.

Here’s to a more gender balanced future!

 

 

The Daffodil Perspective 4th December 2018

This show features an in-depth look at contemporary film and TV composer Debbie Wiseman, following her 25 year career including the soundtrack to Wolf Hall alongside other scores including Downton Abbey by John Lunn. Also on the show is music by Russians Nina Makarova and Khachaturian.

Organisation Of The Week

The first of a very special monthly event with Illuminate Women’s Music, an extraordinary organisation promoting music by women composers and performers. Set up by Angela Slater and including a concert series touring the UK playing living and historical composers. This week I am playing live recordings of the organisers and composers in residence Sarah Westwood, Blair Boyd and Angela Slater.

Discover more about Illuminate’s amazing work on their website.

 

17 Great Women Composers You Need to Know.

Chief t**t, I’m sorry chief classical music critic at the New York Times Anthony Tommasini just published a book of the 17 greatest composers ever. The entire list is comprised of the usual suspects of long dead white male composers: Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, Puccini, Debussy, Stravinsky, Schoenberg and Bartok.

With a few minor variations this is the same list you see in most music books and most websites all over the world. The New York Times article says this represents a

“rounded understanding of classical music at its peak.”

  1. Rounded? Omitting every female composer and composer of colour? Hmm.
  2. Also “at its peak”, really? The most recent composer on there died nearly 50 years ago, so what? Classical music has been declining ever since? Such a terrible way to sell classical music, a genre which like every other is living, breathing and evolving constantly to create new and exciting music.

I’m sick of the utter white patriarchy of the classical music industry so here is my own list of 17 indispensably great composers to counter Tommasini’s and they all happen to be women, each with an amazing composition to check out. (Disclaimer: This is just 17 amazing composers, there are so many which I couldn’t include, so it’s just a starting point, not a definitive list with specific rankings).

  1. Florence Price – American – 1887-1953

Florence Price mixes African American spiritual and American folk idioms with Western classical music. The first African American to have a symphony performed by a major orchestra in 1932 with Symphony in E minor. She also wrote over 300 pieces including orchestral suites, string quartets, solo piano and choral music.

2. Dame Ethel Smyth – English – 1858-1944

Composer and suffragette, she was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 1922, one of the highest honours in the UK, and the 1st female composer to be awarded the honour, I think that makes her pretty great. Wrote 6 operas, a ballet, orchestral suites, string quartets, and violin concertante. The Mass in D was written in 1893.

3. Vitezslava Kapralova – Czech – 1915-1940

Inter war composer, child prodigy and conductor. 1st woman composer inducted to the Czech Academy of Sciences and Arts. (Posthumous appt in 1946, she was 1 of only 10 woman inducted up to that point). Contemporary of Martinu, she guest conducted Czech Philharmonic and BBC Symphony Orchestra playing her own Military Sinfonietta, written in 1937. Also wrote songs, string quartets, orchestral Suite Rustica, April Preludes for piano.

4. Marianna von Martines – Austrian – 1744-1812

Grew up downstairs from her piano teacher Haydn and became good friends with Mozart. 1st woman to be admitted to the Accademia Filharmonica of Bologna, society to which Mozart also belonged She was at the centre of the classical music scene in Vienna. Ran an influential salon which everybody who was anyone attended. Wrote tons of amazing music including Dixit Dominus, oratorios, keyboard sonatas and an orchestral Sinfonia. The aria Berenice ah che fai is set to a text of Metastasio, famous librettist back in the 1700s.

5. Maria Szymanowska – Polish – 1789-1831

One of the first professional virtuoso pianists of the 19th century. Also ran an influential salon and toured all over Europe. Wrote mostly piano pieces, lots of cool nocturnes and etudes long before Chopin turned up later in the century.

6. Barbara Strozzi – Italian – 1619? – 1677

Prolific Baroque composer of secular vocal music.

7. Ina Boyle – Irish – 1889-1967

Ina led a sheltered life in Ireland but took lessons from Vaughan Williams. She composed 2 symphonies, orchestral rhapsodies, an opera, ballets and choral music.

8. Germain Tailleferre – French – 1892-1983

Only female member of Les Six, the Parisian group of composers that included Poulenc and Milhaud, plus she was good friends with Ravel. She wrote masses of music including music for radio, film and TV when they came along. Played about with different instruments including oboe, clarinet and violin. Lots of dreamy modernist chamber music including this Concertino for harp and piano.

9. Amy Beach – American – 1867-1944

1st American woman to compose and publish a symphony. Beach’s Gaelic Symphony premiered in 1896 with Boston Symphony Orchestra. Child prodigy pianist, she also wrote a piano concerto and over 100 songs. Member of the Boston Six with Edward Macdowell.

10. Emilie Mayer – German – 1812-1883

Romantic composer – Associate Director of the Berlin Opera Academy. Wrote 8 symphonies, cello sonatas, piano trios and Faust Overture, written in 1880.

11. Nina Makarova – Russian – 1908-1976

Russian composer influenced by Russian and Mari folksongs.

12. Dora Pejacevic – Croatian – 1885-1923

Prolific composer, wrote 1st modern symphony in Croatian music with Symphony in F sharp minor in 1917. Other works include a piano concerto, songs and chamber music.

13. Alice Mary Smith – English – 1839-1884

Classical music history makes it look like there were no English composers in the 200 years or so between Thomas Tallis and Edward Elgar. Alice Mary Smith falls into that supposed void with 2 symphonies, vocal music, concert overtures and clarinet music.

Her Andante for Clarinet is the only piece by a historical woman composer being played by the London Philharmonic Orchestra this season.

14. Judith Weir CBE – English – born 1954

First woman appointed as Master of the Queen’s Music in 2014. Known for choral music and operas.

15. Michiru Oshima – Japanese – Born 1961

Composer of film, video games, TV and straight up classical music.

16. Chen Yi – Chinese – Born 1953

1st Chinese woman to receive an MA in composition from Beijing Central Conservatory of Music, Pulitzer Prize finalist. Written for a variety of mediums including concert band.

17. Odaline de la Martinez – Cuban – Born 1949

1st woman ever to conduct the Proms in 1984. Founded Lontano Records to champion music of living composers, women composers and Latin American composers. Fellow of Royal Academy of Music.

There we are, just a tiny fraction of amazing composers who deserve greater recognition. Hopefully this will be a good jumping off point to discover a broader range of music beyond the dead white males that currently fill the concert halls and airwaves. Again this was not a ranking, just a list of 17 like Tommasini’s for conceptual symmetry, in no particular order.

Listen to my weekly radio show The Daffodil Perspective to hear more brilliant composers, over 50% of which are women. I discuss their lives, music and context in standard classical music history.

Gender stats: English Symphony Orchestra

English Symphony Orchestra tweeted that they support living composers. I checked out their gender stats to see if they support women composers.

13 concerts this season, 2 of which have 1 woman composer in them, 1 has Kapralova and 1 has Bacewic.

2/13 concerts with 1 woman composer, that is 15.3 % of concerts featuring a woman composer.

Also coincidentally the 2 concerts featuring a woman composer are in the Venus Unwrapped series at Kings Place.

https://www.eso.co.uk/whats-on/

The Daffodil Perspective 27th November 2018

This show features an in-depth look at early 20th century Czech composer Vitezslava Kapralova, following her life and music with alongside Martinu and Smetana. Also on the show is music from film composers Deborah Lurie and Alan Silvestri.

Album Of The Week

a3alb01269968_large

Four Women by pianist Samantha Ege, a brand new album featuring music from 4 spectacular women composers including the American Florence Price and Margaret Bonds, Vitezslava Kapralova and a world premiere recording of Ethel Bilsland’s The Birthday Party, written 100 years ago.

Available to listen and buy from CDBaby here.